Books On My Reading List This Week – December 7, 2021

Read Along with Me

Another week, another exciting list of books to enjoy. I’ve been getting some great book mail from publicist Stuart Schnee. What could be better than new books arriving in your mailbox? That was the source of two of the books on my list this week.

The first book on my list has an intriguing premise. Cain v Abel places this biblical fratricide in the context of a murder trial. Much of the book is in the format of transcripts of testimony from the trial. As someone who works with civil law cases in my 9 to 5, I’m looking forward to this one.

Grounds for Divorce by Remy Maisel also sounds very interesting. A down-on-her-luck intern finds herself working for the State Department and tasked with resolving the conflict between Israel and Palestine by treating it as a divorce settlement.

The other three on my list are audiobooks selected from my Want to Read list on Goodreads. I’m looking forward to two selections by Liane Moriarty, What Grace Forgot and Big Little Lies. I honestly don’t remember putting them on my list but if they were a recommendation from someone, thank you. And finally, my Torah study group was talking about People Love Dead Jews by Dara Horn recently which motivated me to move it up in my list.

What’s on your reading list this week?


This page contains affiliate links. This means for any purchase made, I receive a small commission at no additional cost to you.

Books This Week

Grounds for Divorce by Remy Maisel
Click the image to find it on Amazon

In a case of badly mistaken identity, Emily, a down-on-her-luck intern, is recruited by the State Department to solve the Palestinian problem. Only this time they want it handled as a divorce settlement.

Travelling across Jerusalem and New York, Emily must rely on the experience of her parents’ disastrous divorce to handle the case. Plus, she went to Hebrew school. If she survived that, how much harder can this be?

In order to pull off the most acrimonious divorce of all time, she must let go of the family trauma that has tainted her whole life… but what if it won’t stay in the past?

Cain v Abel by Rabbi Dan Ornstein

Enter the packed courtroom and take your seat as a juror on the Cain v. Abel trial. Soon, the prosecution and defense attorneys (angels from Jewish legend) will call Cain, Abel, Sin, Adam, Eve, and God to the witness stand to present their perspectives on the world’s first murder. Great Jewish commentators throughout the ages will also offer contradictory testimony on Cain’s emotional, societal, and spiritual influences. As jurors, when we mete out Cain’s punishment, must we factor in his family history, psychological makeup, and the human impulse to sin?

In this highly eclectic and gripping compilation of insights by Jewish commentators on the Cain and Abel story, courtroom scenes are juxtaposed with the author’s commentary, advancing novel insights and introspection. As each of us grapples with Cain’s actions, we confront our own darkest traits. If Cain is a symbol for all humanity, what can we do to avoid becoming like him? Furthering this conversation, Rabbi Dan Ornstein includes a discussion and activity guide to promote open dialogue about human brokenness and healing, personal impulses, and societal responsibility.

Click the image to find it on Amazon

Join 5,500+ Followers

As a thank you for registering for our email list, you’ll receive free printable reading journal templates and a bonus 100 book reading list!


Big Little Lies by Liane Moriarty
Click the image to find it on Amazon

A murder…A tragic accident…Or just parents behaving badly? What’s indisputable is that someone is dead.

Madeline is a force to be reckoned with. She’s funny, biting, and passionate; she remembers everything and forgives no one. Celeste is the kind of beautiful woman who makes the world stop and stare but she is paying a price for the illusion of perfection. New to town, single mom Jane is so young that another mother mistakes her for a nanny. She comes with a mysterious past and a sadness beyond her years. These three women are at different crossroads, but they will all wind up in the same shocking place.

Big Little Lies is a brilliant take on ex-husbands and second wives, mothers and daughters, schoolyard scandal, and the little lies that can turn lethal.

What Alice Forgot by Liane Moriarty

Alice Love is twenty-nine, crazy about her husband, and pregnant with her first child. So imagine Alice’s surprise when she comes to on the floor of a gym (a gym! She HATES the gym) and is whisked off to the hospital where she discovers the honeymoon is truly over—she’s getting divorced, she has three kids, and she’s actually 39 years old. Alice must reconstruct the events of a lost decade, and find out whether it’s possible to reconstruct her life at the same time. She has to figure out why her sister hardly talks to her, and how is it that she’s become one of those super skinny moms with really expensive clothes. Ultimately, Alice must discover whether forgetting is a blessing or a curse, and whether it’s possible to start over…

Click the image to find it on Amazon
People Love Dead Jews by Dara Horn
Click the image to find it on Amazon

Renowned and beloved as a prizewinning novelist, Dara Horn has also been publishing penetrating essays since she was a teenager. Often asked by major publications to write on subjects related to Jewish culture—and increasingly in response to a recent wave of deadly antisemitic attacks—Horn was troubled to realize what all of these assignments had in common: she was being asked to write about dead Jews, never about living ones. In these essays, Horn reflects on subjects as far-flung as the international veneration of Anne Frank, the mythology that Jewish family names were changed at Ellis Island, the blockbuster traveling exhibition Auschwitz, the marketing of the Jewish history of Harbin, China, and the little-known life of the “righteous Gentile” Varian Fry. Throughout, she challenges us to confront the reasons why there might be so much fascination with Jewish deaths, and so little respect for Jewish lives unfolding in the present.

Horn draws upon her travels, her research, and also her own family life—trying to explain Shakespeare’s Shylock to a curious ten-year-old, her anger when swastikas are drawn on desks in her children’s school, the profound perspective offered by traditional religious practice and study—to assert the vitality, complexity, and depth of Jewish life against an antisemitism that, far from being disarmed by the mantra of “Never forget,” is on the rise. As Horn explores the (not so) shocking attacks on the American Jewish community in recent years, she reveals the subtler dehumanization built into the public piety that surrounds the Jewish past—making the radical argument that the benign reverence we give to past horrors is itself a profound affront to human dignity.

Submit Your Book

book for review, please visit Contact Me and complete the form. I’ll review your request and respond within 48 hours. I’m also happy to work with authors on interviews. To set up an interview, please use the same form.

Advertisements

Join 5,500+ Followers

As a thank you for registering for our email list, you’ll receive free printable reading journal templates and a bonus 100 book reading list!

More For Your TBR Pile

Books On My Reading List This Week – November 16, 2021

Read Along with Me Another week, another reading list! I’m still enjoying the company of audio books during the day, while working at my 9 to 5. They’re a refreshing change from playlists on Spotify or leaving a familiar series to stream, just for the noise. I prefer the sense of accomplishment when I complete […]

Books On My Reading List This Week – November 23, 2021

Read Along with Me Happy Thanksgiving week! I hope you will be enjoying a return to in-person gatherings with family and friends to start off the holiday season. I am looking forward to enjoying four books this week: one hardcover and three audio books. The hardcover was on a previous reading list a couple of […]

Books On My Reading List This Week – November 30, 2021

Read Along with Me And just like that, November is coming to an end. I hope you enjoyed your Thanksgiving holiday and the start to the winter holiday shopping season. And of course, Happy third night of Hanukkah! I spent some time this past weekend, doing some reorganizing in my study, grouping my unread books […]

More From the Blog

Books On My Reading List This Week – January 25, 2022
Read Along with Me This week's reading list includes an exciting new release by Roni Robbins, Hands of Gold. A story of overcoming to terms with past traumas and seeking silver lines. Also on my list this week are four audiobooks. The first is a rom-com, The Unhoneymooners. This is an unusual choice for me. …
January Update from Author Heidi Slowinski
Heidi Slowinski Happy 2022 readers! I hope the new year is off to a healthy start. It has been a productive start to the year for me. I am already ahead of schedule with my reading goals and meeting new authors through book reviews and interviews. As I've been working through the month of January, …
Short Story Contest – Deadline is January 31st
Attention writers! This month's short story contest theme is: Fresh Starts Entries must be received by midnight Monday, January 31st, cst. Selected stories will be featured during the month of January. Read on for further guidelines. Guidelines Stories are to be 1,500 to 3,000 words. All genres welcome. Please keep it ‘R’ rated or less. …
[Book Review] Escape Route by Elan Barnehama
Click the image to find it on Amazon By Elan Barnehama Escape Route, set is 1960s New York, opens with Zach's Bar Mitzvah. As the Vietnam War reaches it's peak, Zach becomes fixated with the war. As the son of first generation Holocaust survivors, Zach is fearful of history repeating itself and his family being …

Leave a Comment

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

%d bloggers like this: